Oricula Therapeutics, LLC, is a start-up biotechnology company with a mission to develop medicines that protect hearing and balance from the effects of ototoxic drugs and aging. Our first product will be the first medication to prevent hearing loss in patients undergoing treatment for serious infections with aminoglycoside antibiotics.

The company, founded in 2013, grew from research conducted at the University of Washington and funded through NIDCD and the NINDS Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Program (NIH BPN). The research led to patented findings that form the basis for further development of Oricula's first product. Oricula Therapeutics holds an exclusive license for the core patents and intellectual property from the University of Washington.

The company formed with a team that provides deep experience in hearing and neurological physiology, medical chemistry, drug development and business development.

 
Edwin W. Rubel, PhD

Edwin W. Rubel, PhD

Edwin W. Rubel, PhD
University of Washington, Chaired Professor
Hearing Sciences

Dr. Rubel is the Virginia Merrill Bloedel Professor of Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington (UW), where he is also a Professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Physiology and Biophysics, and Adjunct Professor of Psychology. He received his PhD from Michigan State University where he studied Physiological Psychology and Zoology. Prior faculty appointments were at Yale University and the University of Virginia. Dr. Rubel has won many awards and honors in the field of Hearing Science, including the Jacob Javitz award from the NIH, Presidency of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology (ARO) and Award of Merit from the ARO. He was the founder and Founding Director of the Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center at the UW. For the past 40 years, Dr. Rubel’s laboratory has studied a broad range of topics related to the development, injury and repair of the inner ear, auditory pathways in the brain and sound perception. His laboratory discovered inner ear hair cell regeneration in birds. More than 10 years ago, he joined forces with Drs. Raible and Simon in a collaboration aimed at the prevention of hearing loss resulting from environmental- and age-related injury to the inner ear. See publications.

David W. Raible, PhD

David W. Raible, PhD

David W. Raible, PhD
University of Washington, Professor
Zebrafish Molecular Biology and Development

Dr. Raible is Professor in the Department of Biological Structure at the University of Washington School of Medicine, where he has held a position since 1995. He received his PhD in Neuroscience at the University of Pennsylvania and postdoctoral training at the University of Oregon. Dr. Raible is an expert in molecular genetics and a pioneer in the development of the zebrafish system as a model for human diseases. A decade-long collaboration with Drs. Rubel and Simon resulted in the identification of BPN-0001 as a potential therapeutic for aminoglycoside antibiotic-induced hearing loss. See publications.

Henry Ou, MD

Henry Ou, MD

Henry Ou, MD
University of Washington, Assoc Professor
Pediartric Otolaryngology

Dr. Ou is Associate Professor of Pediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Seattle Children’s Hospital and the University of Washington. He did his residency training at the University of Washington followed by pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training at Seattle Children’s Hospital, where he is currently the medical director of the Hearing Loss Clinic. Dr. Ou has more than 15 years of experience in hearing research with a particular emphasis on the use of the zebrafish lateral line to study ototoxic injury from anti-cancer drugs. See publications.

Julian Simon, PhD

Julian Simon, PhD

Julian Simon, PhD
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Assoc Member;
University of Washington, Affiliate Professor, Medicinal Chemistry

Dr. Simon is Associate Member in Clinical Research and Human Biology Divisions at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Affiliate Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington. He received his PhD in Chemistry at Columbia University and postdoctoral training at Harvard University. Dr. Simon is an expert in medicinal chemistry, phenotypic drug screening and target validation. A long-standing collaboration with Drs. Rubel and Raible led to the identification and preclinical assessment of ORC-13661 for the prevention of aminoglycoside antibiotic-induced hearing loss. See publications.

Vince Groppi, PhD

Vince Groppi, PhD

Vince Groppi, PhD
University of Michigan, Director
Center for Discovery of New Medicines
Drug Development
Molecular Pharmacologist

Dr. Groppi is the Director, Center for Discovery of New Medicines and Director, Center for Chemical Genomics at the University of Michigan and a consultant for the NIH/NINDS Blueprint Therapeutic Network (BPN). Dr. Groppi teaches translational pharmacology at University of Michigan (U-M) and serves on U-M’s Protein Folding Disease Initiative. He received his PhD in Molecular Pharmacology at Rutgers Medical Schools and did his postdoctoral training at University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Groppi is an expert in pharmacology, neuroscience drug discovery and development, including effectively utilizing cell-based assays to drive SAR. Dr. Groppi was the vice president and chief scientific officer of Essen BioScience, an integrated bioscience company. Previously he held positions at Upjohn, Pharmacia and Pfizer leading discovery, development and strategy teams. See publications.

Malcolm Gleser, MD, PhD

Malcolm Gleser, MD, PhD

Malcolm Gleser, MD, PhD
Oricula Therapeutics, CEO
Management, Medicine, Biostatistics

Dr. Gleser has an MD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine and a PhD in Biomathematics and Biostatistics from the University of Cincinnati. After residency in Internal Medicine, Dr. Gleser did cardiovascular physiology research in the military and taught in the Division of Computer Medicine at Yale University. He was the director of the department of Health Services Research at the USPHS Hospital in Seattle, Washington, and later founded PHAMIS Inc., which developed and sold a computer-based medical information system to leading integrated care facilities. Dr. Gleser remained Chairman of PHAMIS after taking it public in 1994, stepping down when PHAMIS was merged with larger companies culminating with the purchase by GE. Dr. Gleser retired in 2007, a year after GE purchased the company. Dr. Gleser joined Oricula as CEO at its founding to guide its growth, financing, licensing and taking its products to market. See publications.

Graham Johnson, PhD

Graham Johnson, PhD

Graham Johnson, PhD
NuPharmAdvise, President
Medicinal Chemistry

During an extensive medicinal chemistry career, Dr. Johnson held a number of senior leadership positions in biotech, large pharmaceuticals and in pharmaceutical consulting. These roles included: Senior Vice President, Preclinical Development and Research for AVI BioPharma (now Sarepta Therapeutics), Chief Research Officer for Rib-X Pharmaceuticals, Vice President of Bristol-Myers Squibb Discovery Chemistry for Connecticut and Canada, and Director of Neuroscience Chemistry for Parke-Davis Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Johnson has worked in such diverse areas as neuroscience, infectious and genitourinary diseases, inflammation and RNA therapeutics, is an inventor on more than 56 patents and has co-authored more than 60 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Johnson is currently a medicinal chemistry consultant to four of the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN) discovery programs. Previously an Independent Observer for the European Union’s Innovative Medicine Initiative, Dr. Johnson now assists this organization with program proposal reviews. Dr. Johnson is President of NuPharmAdvise LLC, a drug discovery consulting practice that serves the medicinal chemistry needs of biotechnology companies, the National Institutes of Health, Venture Capital and Intellectual Property firms.

Marc Bailie, DMV, PhD

Marc Bailie, DMV, PhD

Marc Bailie, DMV, PhD
Chief Development Officer, INDS
Drug Safety and Toxicology

Dr. Bailie is the Director of the In Vivo Facility at Michigan State University and the Chief Development officer of Integrated Nonclinical Development  Solutions (INDS), a drug discovery and development consulting company. Prior to his roles at MSU and INDS, Dr. Bailie spent eleven years at Parke-Davis/Pfizer, developing and directing the Safety Pharmacology Group within Drug Safety Research and Development. He has extensive experience in a broad array of models for the evaluation of pharmacologic and toxicologic activity of compounds. During his tenure in the pharmaceutical development arena he served on numerous Discovery and Development project teams, provided scientific direction for safety pharmacology both locally and on a global basis, and served as expert council for cardiovascular and general safety pharmacology, both within and outside of Pfizer. While at Pfizer, Dr. Bailie contributed significantly to the co-development and characterization of novel animal models to assess the impact of pharmaceutical agents on parameters of cardiac conduction and function.

Judd Walson, MD, MPH

Judd Walson, MD, MPH

Judd Walson MD, MPh
University of Washington, Assoc Prof
Allergy and Infectious Disease
Global Health

Judd Walson, MD, MPH, is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Global Health, Medicine (Allergy and Infectious Disease), Pediatrics and Epidemiology (Adjunct). Dr. Walson is the Project PI of a collaborative consortium between the University of Washington and International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) to conduct clinical trials of potential interventions to treat and prevent environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) and childhood stunting. He has an extensive history of conducting large observational studies and clinical trials in Africa and Asia, funded by NIH, CDC, private foundations and industry. Dr. Walson’s research focuses on studies of infectious disease, including enteric and diarrheal disease, HIV and endemic co-infections. Dr. Walson is the Project PI of a large ongoing study of enteric disease and acute illness in Kenyan children at multiple sites in Western Kenya. He has extensive experience in the design and implementation of observational research and clinical trials, and works closely with numerous government and non-governmental organizations. He has strong relationships with stakeholders in Kenya and Bangladesh, and a history of effective partnerships and collaborations in both countries.